Tuesday, August 15, 2006

So Mr. Olmert ? What'cha Doin After Politics ?

Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Olmert is shortly going to be out of a job.

The recent cease-fire, on all counts, is an absolute disaster for Israel – and not too good for Israel’s friend, the United States – either. The débâcle is mostly the fault of the Olmert government.

Following the kidnapping by Hezbollah of two Israeli soldiers, President Bush gave Israel what amounted to a month-long hunting license, effectively stalling the diplomats to afford Israel a chance to smash Hezbollah. It is now apparent that the Olmert government squandered its precious opportunity, dithered, and opted to try to do the job on the cheap. First, the Israelis tried airpower and artillery alone; then very limited ground incursions, to keep casualties down; and finally getting serious with large numbers of ground troops in the last week -- too late. Israel got all the bad press attendant on using any military option – for virtually no result.

It appears that at least some of the planners in the IDF General Staff suggested a larger ground effort from the outset, to have the suggestion vetoed by either the Prime Minister, or by the Chief of the General Staff, Lieutenant-General Dan Halutz, whose background is in the Israeli Air Force. What really happened will no doubt be dissected in nauseating detail in the coming weeks, but it is certain that the air-heavy nature of the initial Israeli effort was a mistake.

Prime Minister Olmert, as Caroline Glick’s column in the Jerusalem Post makes apparent, is almost certainly on the way out. General Halutz’s days appear numbered as well: Haaretz reports today that the general is under fire for his sale of an investment portfolio hours after Hezbollah abducted the Israeli soldiers. Given the at-best ambigious ending to this conflict, General Halutz’s job would be in serious jeopardy even without such criticism.

The only Israeli winner in all of this is Benjamin Netanyahu, probably the most hard-line major Israeli politician, – and the next Israeli Prime Minister.

7 comments:

Ken said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
El Jefe Maximo said...

The above appeared to be marketing spam...so the Organs of State Security, always, like good Chekists -- on watch, struck promptly...

louielouie said...

natural born cynic that i am, and hopefully to be proven wrong, i sort of wonder out loud if the anti-war left will take hold. they may decide to go back to sleep with mr. olmert in control.
israel seems to have found their cindy sheehan, in author david grossman, whose son was killed on the 33rd day of fighting. according to mr. grossman, "israel has exhausted its' right to defend itself".
not to be accused of being a conspiracy theorist look for a name like effi eitam. not as polished as bibi, but apparently someone the jooos listen to.

Zarba said...

We will rue the day we allowed the Hezbos to walk away alive.

They'll rest, rearm, and recruit until the next time they decide to attack.

Before this is over, I fear it will make The Crusades look like a month at Sandals.

Voyager said...

How could a country like Israel appoint an AirForce man as Chief of Staff ? It is bizarre. Israel depends upon its Army using the Air Force in support as flying artillery - it does not have a Strategic Air Command nor the kind of heavy bombers needed for such a strategy.

Israel should ALWAYS have the Army in charge.............

Rick said...

The doctors who incapacitated Sharon by not anticipating cerebral haemhorraging have much to answer for - and the way he is now is a shameful way to treat a man who must suffer a protracted death

El Jefe Maximo said...

I wonder if it will be the Hezbos re-arming and attacking again. I'm kinda thinking the Israelis might have themselves a little political and military housecleaning, find a new Prime Minister; new Chief of Staff; and new Security Cabinet, and then find a reason to re-open hunting season...

I agree with the commenter about putting air force generals in charge in Israel...except...except, I can sort of see some convincing reasons on the near horizon why the perspective of an airdale might be deserving of some serious attention.